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https://www.kaskus.co.id/thread/57bf97cdd44f9f6d428b4569/efl-or-esl
EFL or ESL
The issue of English as a foreign language (EFL) or English as a second language (ESL) in Indonesia is not a hot. As my first thread in Kaskus, I hope it will quite interesting to be discussed.

Spoiler for English Language:


The position of English in Indonesia is as a foreign language. Nevertheless, English is not similar to another foreign language like Arabic, Dutch, or France. English in Indonesia is not only used for education but also in business and commerce level. What is more, the position of English as an International language elevate English as the most popular foreign language that is used in Indonesia.

Spoiler for local public sign:

Spoiler for official public sign:


Today, most of Indonesian use English in their daily life. It is used in advertisement and public sign. Interestingly, the advertisement and the public sign are not controled by the goverment. Consequently, Indonesian use English rather than Indonesian.

Now, since the position of English in Indonesian is the second most popular language in Indonesian, after Indonesian. What do you think if one day, English becomes ESL in Indonesian? or it's just fine with EFL?emoticon-Jempol
Quote:Original Posted By playonus
The issue of English as a foreign language (EFL) or English as a second language (ESL) in Indonesia is not a hot. As my first thread in Kaskus, I hope it will quite interesting to be discussed.

Spoiler for English Language:


The position of English in Indonesia is as a foreign language. Nevertheless, English is not similar to another foreign language like Arabic, Dutch, or France. English in Indonesia is not only used for education but also in business and commerce level. What is more, the position of English as an International language elevate English as the most popular foreign language that is used in Indonesia.

Spoiler for local public sign:

Spoiler for official public sign:


Today, most of Indonesian use English in their daily life. It is used in advertisement and public sign. Interestingly, the advertisement and the public sign are not controled by the goverment. Consequently, Indonesian use English rather than Indonesian.

Now, since the position of English in Indonesian is the second most popular language in Indonesian, after Indonesian. What do you think if one day, English becomes ESL in Indonesian? or it's just fine with EFL?emoticon-Jempol


I'm not sure if English as an ESL would work here in our nation.

I mean, look at Singapore. Singapore has chosen English as their national language. National language, not less. But in reality, there is still quite considerable number of people living there who don't speak the language, especially the older generation members.

What I said above is just my humble opinion, though.

Now what advantages do you think we are to get by establishing English as an ESL? I'd love to hear it from you emoticon-Angkat Beer
Quote:Original Posted By pathfinder87


I'm not sure if English as an ESL would work here in our nation.

I mean, look at Singapore. Singapore has chosen English as their national language. National language, not less. But in reality, there is still quite considerable number of people living there who don't speak the language, especially the older generation members.

What I said above is just my humble opinion, though.

Now what advantages do you think we are to get by establishing English as an ESL? I'd love to hear it from you emoticon-Angkat Beer


Of course there are tons of reason to envelope the possibility of ESL. In my opinion there is no advantages to us establishing EFL into ESL and I'm also agree that ESL would not work in our nation. It's only a matter of status. Nevertheless, with the clear status of English in Indonesia, hopefully, the government can stack the language into the proper place. As a matter of system of communication, English takes more greater role then before. For an example, today, some official public sign are written in English. Well, if the government it self can not make sure to the use of Indonesian, can we doubt the position of English in Indonesia?

In case of Singapore, well, I don't know if English becomes their national language. In my head, I think the old Singaporean speak Malay and the new generation who were spoke Malay of Singaporean wraps English into Singlish. Well, of course the creole (Singlish) emerges after English becomes ESL in Singapore. I just can't imagine if our government continuously use English publicly. Are the position of English will be lifted?

Now, some experts had called English which is used by Indonesian EFL's learners as "Indonesian English." What do you think about that? Do you agree with the term or you have another idea? emoticon-Toast
Quote:Original Posted By playonus


Of course there are tons of reason to envelope the possibility of ESL. In my opinion there is no advantages to us establishing EFL into ESL and I'm also agree that ESL would not work in our nation. It's only a matter of status. Nevertheless, with the clear status of English in Indonesia, hopefully, the government can stack the language into the proper place. As a matter of system of communication, English takes more greater role then before. For an example, today, some official public sign are written in English. Well, if the government it self can not make sure to the use of Indonesian, can we doubt the position of English in Indonesia?

In case of Singapore, well, I don't know if English becomes their national language. In my head, I think the old Singaporean speak Malay and the new generation who were spoke Malay of Singaporean wraps English into Singlish. Well, of course the creole (Singlish) emerges after English becomes ESL in Singapore. I just can't imagine if our government continuously use English publicly. Are the position of English will be lifted?

Now, some experts had called English which is used by Indonesian EFL's learners as "Indonesian English." What do you think about that? Do you agree with the term or you have another idea? emoticon-Toast


Yes, English is one of the Singapore's national languages (I just realized that malay, Mandarin and Tamil are also their official languages)

Indonesian English? Well, frankly I find it a bit ridiculous. I dont mind the term indonesian-accented English, but Indonesian English? I mean, English is not eveb an ESL here. Why bother calling it indonesian-accented English?

Yes, there are language variations like brazilian portuguese, australian english, etc. they can be called as such because the languages are officially spoken by all citizens of the nations.

Calling the English used in our country as Indonesian English, to me, is somewhat an overkill emoticon-Stick Out Tongue emoticon-Stick Out Tongue

Everything I said above is just my two cents. I'm not a language major, nor am I a linguist emoticon-Malu (S)
Well, the idea of Indonesian English emerges since we can not take out our accent. In speaking, I think it's hard to find the way we can imitate British or American accent. In my slide of thought, It's not a matter of EFL or ESL but the accent pushed the non-ideal English become reality. For example, Hinglish or Chinglish are the frame of the development of the non-ideal English. How about Indonesian? Then I'm looking forward Indonesian English as the experts suggest to use that term.

nb. Im also not a linguist gan'.... I am only quibers. emoticon-Ultah
Quote:Original Posted By pathfinder87


Yes, English is one of the Singapore's national languages (I just realized that malay, Mandarin and Tamil are also their official languages)

Indonesian English? Well, frankly I find it a bit ridiculous. I dont mind the term indonesian-accented English, but Indonesian English? I mean, English is not eveb an ESL here. Why bother calling it indonesian-accented English?

Yes, there are language variations like brazilian portuguese, australian english, etc. they can be called as such because the languages are officially spoken by all citizens of the nations.

Calling the English used in our country as Indonesian English, to me, is somewhat an overkill emoticon-Stick Out Tongue emoticon-Stick Out Tongue

Everything I said above is just my two cents. I'm not a language major, nor am I a linguist emoticon-Malu (S)


Well, the idea of Indonesian English emerges since we can not take out our accent. In speaking, I think it's hard to find the way we can imitate British or American accent. In my slide of thought, It's not a matter of EFL or ESL but the accent pushed the non-ideal English become reality. For example, Hinglish or Chinglish are the frame of the development of the non-ideal English. How about Indonesian? Then I'm looking forward Indonesian English as the experts suggest to use that term.

nb. Im also not a linguist gan'.... I am only quibers. emoticon-Ultah