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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Quote:Sesuai Judul di atas, Pics ini akan mengabadikan momen momen dari Royal Italian Armed Forces (Regio Esercito) selama PD II berlangsung. Ingat Pic hanya dari sisi Italia saja, bukan dari sisi Allies atau Axis macam Germany, Bulgaria dan Hungaria. emoticon-Big Grin

Yang mau sumbang Pics, harap cantumkan informasi dari picsnya, jangan langsung main taruh tanpa keterangan. Keterangan sekecil apapun akan sangat membantu untuk memudahkan orang yang melihat thread ini memahami isi Pics Yang ada. emoticon-Smilie

Oke mari kita mulai trit ini,

Quote:BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Rudolfo Graziani in his heyday

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Rudolfo Graziani giving medal to one of his soldier

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
An Italian Air Force’s raid over a Corsica’s airfield during the first day of the war. The first raid occurred on 15 June 1940 when six S.79 of the 9th Stormo, based at Viterbo, raided the Ghisonaccia airfield, losing an airplane, while five S.79 of the 46th Stormo, based at Pisa-San Giusto, escorted by nine G.50 of the 52nd Stormo’s 22nd Gruppo, bombed the Calvi harbor. Victor Sierra


Quote:BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
An Italian trainer Nardi FN.305 warming its engine on a Northern Italy airfield. The civilian personnel around the aircraft and the absence of the unit’s marking state perhaps a fresh factory FN.305 likely during the fight test at Albenga airfield, Liguria, before the delivery to Regia Aeronautica. According the camouflage and the white cross on the rudder, the photo was taken during the war years. The FN.305, designed by the Nardi brothers and produced by Piaggio at Finale Ligure, was the basic advanced trainer of the Regia Aeronautica, an excellent airplane with retractable main landing gear and powered by a 185-HP Alfa Romeo 115, a de Havilland Gipsy Queen’s Italian version. Victor Sierra

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
A Regia Aeronautica’s Fiat G.50 used as advanced fighter trainer of the Castiglion del Lago Flight School in final approach to Castiglion del Lago airfield in front to Lake Trasimeno, Umbria, Central Italy, likely 1941. The large wings white bands specify a trainer aircraft. Victor Sierra
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The adoption os mascots was something that all sides had in common in the Western Desert. Here, Italian airmen watch the antics of two puppies under the shade of a Caproni Ca.309 Ghibli. Exact date and place unknow.


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Giuseppe Torcasio in uniform with the Corps Heavy Artillery Regiment insignia on his Peaked Visor Cap, During World War II Tripoli, North Africa 1942


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Giuseppe Torcasio 2nd from the right in North Africa WW II.
Giuseppe was in the 52nd Heavy Artillery Battalion: 2 x 152mm Heavy Howitzer, A WW II veteran who saw action in Tobruk and El Alamein North Africa
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Take-off from Aviano, North-East Italy, of Fiat BR.20M bomber of the Regia Aeronautica 18th Stormo, allocated to 2nd Squadra, likey for a raid over Yugoslavian targets during the brief war against the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, April 1941. Victor Sierra

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
The large Aviano airfield, an important Regia Aeronautica’s air base in the North-East Italy, at the foots of the Eastern Alps, likely Winter 1940. The airplanes are the obsolescent bombers Savoia-Marchetti S.81 downgraded to training aircraft and allocated to Aviano Bomber School. Today Aviano, military airport under Italian Air Force’s control, is the main USAAF’s air base in Italy. Victor Sierra


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The nose of on Italian prototype fighter aircraft, today forgotten: the Caproni-Vizzola F.6M, one of the fighters designed by Fabrizio Fabrizi and of the which the only built in very few exemplars was the F.5. The F.6M was designed by Fabrizi coupling the airframe of the F.6, another prototype, with the German engine Daimler-Benz DB.605, produce in Italy under license and adopted by the “Series 5” fighters (MC.205, G.55 and Re.2005), and built late 1942 by Caproni-Vizzola (a Caproni Group company). On the contrary of its predecessors, the F.6M had an entirely metal structure and four 12.7mm machine-guns: two in the fuselage synchronized with the propeller and two in the wing. The photo show the first prototype’s version with the radiator under the nose, afterward under the fuselage’s belly. During the test the F.6M recorded a speed of 570 km/h at 5,000 meters and a climbing speed to 6,000 meters of 5 minutes and 40 seconds. Victor Sierra

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Gorizia airfield, North-East Italy, Autumn 1941: the first Macchi MC.202 “Folgore” just delivered to 4th Stormo’s IX Gruppo, Italian Air Force. Notice the plane in foreground with cowling removed for engine inspection and test. All the airplane, without anti-sand filter, have the “continental” camouflage. Victor Sierra


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The cockpit of an Italian fighter Macchi MC.202 “Folgore” (Lightning). Victor Sierra

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Macchi MC.202 “Folgore” of the Regia Aeronautica’s 153rd Gruppo in flight over the Sicily, Summer 1942. Victor Sierra


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This Italian torpedo aircraft S.79 of the 104th Gruppo Aerosiluranti (104th Torpedo Aircraft Group), 253rd Squadriglia, equipped with Alpha 128 engines, based at Gadouras, Rhodes, photographed early 1943, has an experimental camouflage for the torpedo aircraft. This camouflage, without the white fuselage band too much visible during the darkness missions, and fuselage number red, is knew only of 104th Gruppo’s aircrafts. Victor Sierra
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The initial of the Mussolini’s signature on the fin of Regia Aeronautica’s bomber Savoia-Marchetti S.79 at beginning on Summer 1940. The planes are S.79 of 41st Gruppo’s 205th Squadriglia from early July 1940 based at Rhodes which was employed the British fleet and also against Haifa. The last raid over Haifa date 6 August 1940. Later the 41st Gruppo returned in Italy for transition to Cant-Z-1007bis. Notice the aircraft without the forward upper machine gun. Victor Sierra


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The Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs and Benito Mussolini's son-in-law Count Galeazzo Ciano just landed with an Ala Littoria’s Savoia-Marchetti S.74 at Rome-Littorio after its first official visit in Germany from 21 to 23 October 1936. During this mission, which included a visit to German Air Ministry where was received by Hermann Göring, Ciano met at Berlin the Third Reich’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Konstantin von Neurath and, at Berchtesgaden Adolf Hitler. The Ciano’s visit in Germany prepared the announcement, by the Duce at Milan on 1st November 1936, the born of the Axis Rome-Berlin. Victor Sierra


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RSI MG team in Italy 1944-1945
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RSI Bersaglieri soldiers and they young volunteer. Italy 1944

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Black Shirts cadets making the salute. DVX

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Italian motor torpedoboot MAS 527 and MAS 528
Punkasalmi 1942.06.14


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An Italian Air Force’s Messerschmitt Bf 109 concealed under the trees of a Sicilian airfield in the attempt of the escape from the Allied air power, late June-first days July 1943. The most part of the Regia Aeronautica’s Bf 109 was destroyed on the ground by the Allied air raids during the preparation of the landing in Sicily. Victor Sierra
Quote:Yang mau sumbang Pics, harap cantumkan informasi dari picsnya, jangan langsung main taruh tanpa keterangan. Keterangan sekecil apapun akan sangat membantu untuk memudahkan orang yang melihat thread ini memahami isi Pics Yang ada


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Sciacca airfield, Sicily, July 1943: a mix of fighters of any types, modern and obsolescent, gathered by the Italians of the last, desperate defence of the Sicilian skies against the air attacks immediately before the Allied landing in the Island. In foreground a Messerschmitt 109 of the 364th Squadriglia, 150th Gruppo, on the right a Macchi MC.200 and, in background, two Macchi MC.202. Victor Sierra

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
One of the dozen “Dora” urgently delivered to Italian Regia Aeronautica by the Luftwaffe late Spring 1943, the Ju 87D MM7054, of the 206th Squadriglia abandoned likely on Chilivani airfield, Sardinia, after the Italy’s armistice, September 1943. Notice the absence of the Fascist emblems cancelled after the Mussolini’s fall, 25 July 1943. Victor Sierra
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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
The Fiat CR.42 aircraft number 14 of the 85th Squadriglia of the Regia Aeronautica’s 18th Gruppo Caccia Terrestre (18th Land Fighter Group) in flight over the clouds. At the Italy’s entry in the war, 10 June 1940, the 18th Gruppo “Frecce” (Arrows), motto in Venetian dialect «Ocio che te copo!..» (Beware... I'll kill you!), leader Maggiore Ferruccio Vossilla, based at Alessandria and Novi Ligure, North-Western Italy, was part of 3rd Stormo Caccia Terrestre. At the moment of the transfer in Belgium, Autumn 1940, for take part to air operations over the Channel against the Britain, an unlucky and useless mission requested by Mussolini but not by the Germans, the 18th Gruppo was deployed at Maldegen. Likely the aircraft of the picture, with the yellow engine cowling adopted in Belgium, wasn’t photographed during the operations from Maldegen but after the return of the Gruppo in Italy early 1941. Victor Sierra
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Battleship Littorio quite high speed navigating in open sea. DVX


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Regia Aeronautica’s Macchi MC.202 “Folgore” of the 4th Stormo, on Italian Mainland airfield. The bright green of the grass and the pilot’s dress suggest the beginning of the Spring, likely 1942. Victor Sierra


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The mechanics of 279th Squadriglia carry on, using modest and rough tools, the change of the tail of the 279-1. Gadouras Airport, or Aeroporto di Gadurrà, during the war indicated by the Italian Commands as Aeroporto Militare 806 (Military Airport 806), was also known in English as Kalathos Airfield. Today is completely neglect. Victor Sierra

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Italian battleship, "Vittorio Veneto" shows her teeth in the battle of Gavdos, first phase of the Battle of Cape Matapan, off the southern point of the Greek mainland coast, March 1941. An Italian battle fleet consisting of the Vittorio Veneto (flagship), along with 6 heavy cruisers, 2 light cruisers and supporting destroyers, were moving to intercept British troop convoys to Greece when their movements and intentions were discovered by British electronic intelligence (ULTRA intercepts). This allowed the Royal Navy fleet in the eastern Med. to intercept them in the region of Cape Matapan with superior forces, including 3 updated WW1 battleships. The Gavros action was rather a stand-off, in which Vittorio Veneto drove off a force of British cruisers, but at the expence of suffering significant damage from an airborne torpedo hit. The second stage of the engagement - a night battle off Cape Matapan - proved disastrous for the Italians. The British had radar capable of locating the Italian ships at night; the Italians had no similar capacity. The result was that the Italians lost a whole heavy cruiser division - 3 heavy cruisers - to Royal Navy gunfire which they had no way of answering. The Italians also lost two destroyers. By contrast, the British lost one torpedo bomber - the one that had damaged Vittorio Veneto, but was shot down by the battleship's antiaircraft guns. As a result of Cape Matapan, both sides became aware of each others' strengths and weaknesses, somewhat limiting the operations of both until the Med. war turned decisively against the Axis. Best regards, JR.
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The wreck completely burned of one of five Aeronautica Nazionale Reoubblicana’s S.79bis torpedo bombers destroyed by an Italian partisan commando on 20 October 1944 at Arcore airfield. A second attack against the Arcore airfield, so as to destroy aircrafts and vehicles, was attempted by the same SAP, Squadra d’Azione Patriottica, of the 20 October 1944, well informed about the airfield’s garrison and its movements, on 29 December night 1944. The commando, leaded again by Iginio Rota “Acciaio”(“Steel”), were composed by some partisan of the same 20 October action with an excellent armament which included also a Breda 30 mm MG. But this time the partisans encountered a heavy reaction of the Fascist forces. In the combat Rota, to which misfired the sun-machine gun, was killed and her comrades was obliged to escape but was arrested few day after. Of this only Carlo Levati “Tom” escaped to capture, the other, Emilio Cereda, Pierino Colombo, Aldo Motta, Renato Pellegatta, all around 20 years aged and all participant of the 20 October 1944 action, was captured and shot on 2 February 1945 inside the same Arcore airfield. The late today no more exist. Victor Sierra


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Regia Aeronautica’s transport aircraft Savoia-Marchetti S.82 “Marsupiale” (Marsupial) parked on the apron of an Italy Mainland’s airfield (notice the large flap down) overflew by three Savoia-Marchetti S.79 bombers just before the Italy’s entry in the war, 1940. Victor Sierra


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Benghazi, Libya. 1941: British prisoners board an Italian transport aircraft Savoia-Marchetti S.82 ready to take-off to Lecce, Southern Italy, for their transfer to a concentration camp. Victor Sierra
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Mussolini with a Soldier of his personal Guard, the "Moschettieri del Duce"

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Fight souvenir: bullet’s sign over a sliding window of the canopy of an Italian Air Force’s Reggiane Re.2001 fighter aircraft. Sicily, 1942. Victor Sierra

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Summer 1942: an Italian fighter returned at the base in Sicily with the shot’s sign received after a dogfight with RAF’s fighters likely over Malta. The plane is one of the Reggiane Re 2001 Falco II (Hawk II) of the 152nd Squadriglia with well visible the emblem (the submachine gun armed duck) of this unit of the 2nd Gruppo Caccia. The late was the first Regia Aeronautica’s unit equipped with the Re.2001. Based in Sicily, Caltagirone airfield from 4 May 1942 and from half August of the same 1942 at Trapani, Chinisia airfield, the 2nd Gruppo was immediately tasked for bomber escort missions over Malta and the Western Mediterranean. In the operations against Malta the Reggiane little fighter revealed itself an airplane able to absorb serious damages taking back his pilot. But the cost to 2nd Gruppo the loss of two of its leader: Aldo Quarantotti, missed in action on 12 July 1942 during the search in bad weather of a Gruppo’s pilot not returned, and Pierluigi Scarpetta, successor of the same Quarantotti, shot down together two other 2nd Gruppo’s pilot on 13 August 1942 by RAF’s fighters about 20 Km NE Linosa island. Victor Sierra
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Italian Breda 35 and a AB 41 Armored Car in North Africa


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This strange craft is the service station Zara 1 (Stazione di Servizio Zara 1) specifically designed at Taranto by Alcibiade Ascanelli for service afloat of the Regia Aeronautica’s seaplanes in particular the CRDA Cant-Z-501, for refueling, ordnance’s supply and maintenance and repair. In this photo a Cant-Z-501 aboard of the Zara 1 for repair and overhaul works. Victor Sierra
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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
During his 90 year of history the Italian Air Force employed not only aircraft but also some boat mostly used in attendance to seaplane units in the air harbor. In this photo a high-sea rescue motorboat Rama (Motoscafo Soccorso d'Alto Mare Regia Aeronautica) employed by the Regia Aeronautica around later Thirties/early Forties XX Century in the air harbor of Cadimare, near La Spezia, Liguria. This motorboat were able to afford the sea in gale and strong gale conditions. During the East African Campaign, on Summer 1940 three Regia Aeronautica’s motorboat was allocated to Regia Marina (Italian Navy) as reinforcement of the torpedo boat’s line somewhat tatty of the XXI Squadriglia MAS, at Massawa, Eritrea. The Air Force’s boats was modified in loco with torpedo and depth charges. Victor Sierra
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A priest, surely a military chaplain, address some word to Regia Aeronautica’s personnel at a Southern Italy airport, likely after a religious ceremony. The white liturgical color of the priest’s vestments reveal a high religious festivity. Considering the winter dress of the personnel, is believable or Christmas or, more probable according my opinion, the festivity of the Loreto Virgin, the aviators Celeste Patrona (Celestial Patron), a festivity which fall on 10 December. In this case the date of the photo is 10 December 1942. The fighter aircraft in background is a Macchi MC.202 of the 88th Squadriglia, 6th Gruppo, 1st Stormo “Arciere” (Archer). In background some transport aircraft S.82. Victor Sierra
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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Regia Aeronautica’s Officers on an Italian Mainland base dressed two with the classic dark grey-blue uniform in use until to second half Eighties of XX Century and the two other with the Sahariana, an elegant and handy clothing used by the Italian Armed Forces Officers during the WW2 especially in North Africa (as specified by the name). The Officer on the right fitted with a camera (the mythic Leica?) is a Capitano (Captain) as indicated by the ranks over the sleeve, but isn’t a pilot - notice in effect the absence of the turreted eagle (the “Aquila Turrita”, even now official emblem of the Italian Armed Forces Officers licensed militaries pilots) – likely an Officer of the Administrative Services. The ranks are repeated over the cover, the “bustina” (garrison cap), abandoned by the Officers after the war in favor to the beret, but restored by the modern Italian Air Force’s uniform (but not much loved, the Officer preferring the beret). The Officer in the center of the photo, with a large orange envelope (typical of the Government’s envelopes) is a military pilot, as indicated by the “Aquila Turrita”, with many ribbon amounting to a number of militaries honor plus a military order, is a Maggiore or Tenente Colonnello (Major or Lt. Colonel) with Staff’s task ad indicated by the symbol over the ranks, perhaps an Aiutante di Volo (Flight Adjutant) of High Command General. On the left with the darker Sahariana a high rank Officer, an Air Force’s (grey-blue beret) three star General (Generale di Squadra Aerea, Lieutenant General in US Armed Forces), likely Commander in Chief of an Air Force’s High Command. Difficult discover exactly the rank of the second from left Officer, with the pale Sahariana. The flawless conditions of the prescribed uniform seem indicate a meet on an Italian Mainland base with representative of a Regia Aeronautica’s High Command (the “High Poppies” in the Italian Armed Forces slang). Victor Sierra
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Cross-section of an Italian "Thermos" bomb; picture abstracted by "Italian and French Explosive Ordnance", Bureau of Ordnance (US Navy) publication 14 June 1946. “Thermos bomb” is the nickname of the Anti-personnel (AP) Bomb Manzolini, or 4 AR, for the Italians “Spezzone”, employed in Libya during the first phase of the war both by the S.79 (which used also the 2 kg “spezzoni”) and Breda 65 of the 50th Stormo Assalto. In substance a multipurpose mine scatterable by aircraft used against airfields, vehicles and personnel. The bomb was a cylinder with lenght 31 centimetre long and weight 3.68 kilograms. It could be fitted with a very sensitive motion-sensitive fuze that would detonate if any attempt was made to move it, and could be lethal in the open up to around 35 metres away. A later variant of the fuze introduced an additional time delayed detonation, which was triggered between 60 to 80 hours after. Victor Sierra

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
The Breda-SAFAT 12.7mm (.500 in) machine gun in the dorsal turret backward defence of an Italian bomber Savoia-Marchetti S.79’s traversed at high elevation’s angle. Its caliber made this MG – on the S.79 with two loader, each with 250 shot, side angle traverse 300 degrees for each sector, elevation angle traverse 70 degrees, muzzle velocity 765 meter per second (2,510 ft/s) installed also in the dorsal turret of the Fiat BR.20M and CRDA Cant-Z-1007bis bombers - a weapon for its time particularly redoubtable. In effect the most common British bomber in the Mediterranean theater at beginning of the war, the Bristol Blenheim Mk 1, had a dorsal turret with a single 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers K, later two, but again of the same caliber, on the Blenheim IV. Victor Sierra


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Splinter’s traces over the fabric covering of the fuselage’s aft section of an Italian bomber Savoia-Marchetti S.79 of the 257th Squadriglia, 109th Gruppo, 36th Stormo, Castelvetrano, Sicily. The lack of the fuselage white band date this photo Summer 1940, few after the entry in war of the Italy. The photo highlight the waist station of the Breda-SAFAT 7.7 mm machine gun in this moment traversed on the fuselage’s right side. Under the fuselage is also visible the nacelle (removed in the S.79 torpedo aircraft) with the Breda-SAFAT 12.7 mm (.500 in) machine gun used for the downward defence. Visible also the strut of the right horizontal plan. Victor Sierra
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M13/40 Italian medium tanks parade through Tripoli, Libya, 1941. Sandbags were dispensed with in this relatively safe environment. I had not really noticed before - but is notable (though perhaps not surprising) how often sandbag supplemental armour appears in photos of this tank. Best regards, JR.

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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
Good left-side-view of a CA M13/40 in motion in the Western Desert. This example carries the additional (fourth) roof-mounted Breda 8-mm machine gun intended for anti-aircraft use; a relatively unusual feature, I think. Supplementary armour, in the form of sandbags, is also present. Best regards, JR.


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Italian Carro Armato CM13/40 medium tanks in action in North Africa. The extraordinary number of sandbags attached to the vehicles represents what is probably a realistic appraisal of the inadequacies of this tank's armour against British tank guns. And this was Italy's best true tank ... However brave Italian soldiers may have been, the poor quality of much of their equipment, from rifles up, gave them little chance of victory in a war in which machinery mattered. Best regards, JR.
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I at first thought that this was a destroyed tankette, but closer inspection suggests that it is actually an Italian Carro Armato M13/40 medium tank which has suffered a catastrophic internal explosion, resulting in serious disruption to the armour plate and the "popping off" of the turret. I think you can just see the turret ring in the tank's deck, and one side of the turret to the left of the photograph. Best regards, JR.


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Italian Armoured Cavalry Squadron with Fiat 508 CM 1100 - 1939
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BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
An Italian pilot going on board of a Breda 65/Fiat A-80 single seat ground attack airplane with engine idling for warm. This photo well highlight the wing installation of the Breda 65’s weapons and the different barrel’s length of the two version of the Breda-SAFAT machine guns: shorter the barrel of the 7.7 mm (0.30), the external MG, longer the barrel of the 12.7 mm (0.50), the inner MG. The fixed armament of this “Aereo d’Assalto” (literally “assault aircraft”), which ended the series of aircraft influenced by the theories about the “Aviazione d’Assalto” (assault aviation) of Amedeo Mecozzi, (previous Ansaldo-Dewoitine AC.1, Caproni AP.1 and Breda 64), was four MG, two 7.7 mm, two 12.7 mm in the wings, for the single seat version, or five weapons, the four MG in the wings plus another flexible 12.7 in turret, for the two-seat version. Of the four airplanes developed in accord with the Mecozzi’s theories, the Breda 65 was the only used in true war operations: by the Italian Regia Aeronautica in the Spanish Civil War and in North Africa during the first months of Italy’s involvement in the WW2 and, for a very brief time, by the Iraqi Air Force during the Iraqi’s uprising against the British. Victor Sierra
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One of the two autogyro Cierva C.8L Mk III built in Great Britain by Avro and purchased in 1929 by the Italian Air Force for practice around the rotary wing. The aircraft is photographed perhaps at Littorio airfield, Rome. After some years of interruption, also following the test of the first Corradino D’Ascanio’s helicopters, the interest for the autogyro was resumed and on 1935 the Regia Aeronautica purchased two Cierva C.30, equally British-made, registered MM320 and MM321 (the latter, construction number 753, former British civil registration G-ACXA). The MM320 was provisionally switched to Italian Navy for test on board the war ship with unsatisfactory results, while the MM321 was employed for a series of tests at Guidonia and Venegono in the years immediately before the outbreak of the war and later re-registered MM30030. On May 1942 was dismissed from the military line and sold to gliding’s pioneer Vittorio Bonomi and registered as civil aircraft, I-CIER. Survived to the war the I-CIER is today exhibited in the Science and Technology Museum at Milan. In any case the Cierva C.30’s story in Italy is few known and controversial because according some sources the C.30 purchased was in reality only one, the MM30030 later I-CIER. Victor Sierra
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An Italian Air Force’s Sottotenente (Pilot Officer/2nd Lieutenant), likely an Aeronautic Academy’s student in a fighter school on the Italian Mainland during the war years. The aircraft, completely camouflaged and with the large white bands over the wings and the fuselage adopted by the Italian school planes, is a Fiat CR.30B, tandem two seats version of the CR.30, the immediately predecessor of the well-known CR.32. The first CR.30B (B for Biposto/Two-seat) was in reality a sport aircraft built, modifying on 1933 the CR.30 NC3 (Construction Number 3), military registration MM166, for the Coppa Bibescu (Bibescu Trophy), a speed contest for Italian and Rumanian militaries crew along the route Rome-Bucharest. With the CR.30B the Capt. Baldi and the Lieut. Buffa won the Bibescu Contest on 26 September 1933: average speed over the 1,140 km of the route 356 km/h. Later when the CR.30 was superseded from 1935 by the CR.32, many of them was transformed in dual control two-seat for the fighter school airplane role. In the same time, on 1934, four CR.30B was built ex-novo from the Regia Aeronautica and delivered on 1945, plus three for Austria and ten for Hungary. The CR.30B was employed until 1943 and the Regia Aeronautica, clearly pleased by this plane, in full war asked Fiat for the construction of an additional number of CR.30B built indeed at Cameri by Fiat-CANSA between 1941 and 1943. Victor Sierra
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Leros, Aegean Sea: Italian flying boats at Portolago, today Lakki, the large naval base with annexed air harbor built during the Italian domination began on 1912 after the Italian-Turkish War and ended with the German attack on September 1943. The two all silver seaplanes in foreground of this photo, taken on 1937, three years before the Italy’s entry in the World War 2, are modern, for this time, CRDRA Cant-Z-501. In background some Savoia-Marchetti S.55 (the version X was chosen by Italo Balbo for his famous mass cruise Italy-United States-Italy on 1933) at this time still in service as maritime reconnaissance and bombardment seaplane but already obsolescent and being replaced by the Cant-Z-501. The “501” of the photo are in service with the 185th Squadriglia (as indicated by the black number 185 over the fuselage), one of two Squadriglie (the other were the 147th) of the 84th Gruppo Ricognizione Marittima (Maritime Reconnaissance Group). Three year later, at the moment of Italy’s entry in the WW2 (10 June 1940) the 84th Gruppo is still at Leros with a strength of a dozen of Cant-Z-501. Victor Sierra
Quote:BWK warning [pics] Regio Esercito During WW II
One of the few Reggiane Re.2005 “Sagittario” employed by the 362nd Squadriglia for the Sicily’s defense on July 1943. The aircraft, with the white name “Sagittario” on the fin, is in all dark green finish with the red Squadriglia’s number (362) and the white individual number (5) and show, over the white fuselage stripe, the “Spauracchio” (Bogeyman), emblem of the 22nd Gruppo Caccia Terrestre (Land Fighter Group) to which were embedded the 362nd Squadriglia, only Italian Air Force’s unit equipped with the Re.2005. Moreover the aircraft has, under the cockpit, the Fascist emblem, sign of a photo taken before 25 July 1943 (Mussolini’s fall). On 9 July 1943 the 22nd Gruppo had five Re.2005 (four serviceable) plus ten Re.2001 (nine serviceable), sixteen MC.202 (nine serviceable), three MC.200 (two serviceable) and eight Dewoitine D.520 (five serviceable) split between Capodichino (Naples), Capua and Littoria airfield. On the eve of Allied landing in Sicily, on 10 July 1943 eight Re.2005 of the 362nd Squadriglia was hastily moved from Capodichino to Sigonella airfield, Catania. The operational life of the Re.2005s was extremely brief and just after the arrival at Sigonella six of them was destroyed or heavy damaged on the ground by the Allied raids. The two survivor was switched to Reggio Calabria, embedded in the 371st Squadriglia, and on 14 July, both not in combat conditions, returned to Capodichino soon destroyed by an Allied raid. According some sources between late July and early August, ten Re.2005, all aircraft of the first batch included the prototype MM494, was received by the 362nd Squadriglia at Capua and employed in some interception missions but their result are unknown. On 20 July 1943 the MM494 experienced troubles in flight and his pilot bailed out successfully while the plane was destroyed by the impact with the ground. During one of this flight the aircraft MM.96105 reported flutter in the tail with damages to fuselage. Three Re.2005 was immediately switched to Reggiane, at Reggio Emilia, where was disclosed the phenomena’s origins in the high speed dives (over 750-800 km/h). Meantime the Air Force on 26 August 1943 grounded al the Re.2005 waiting for a corrective action. But by now was too late and the few “Sagittario” survivor was embedded on Autumn 1943 by the Repubblica Sociale Italiana’s Air Force but never employed as operative aircraft. Victor Sierra